top of page
Search

Lionfish in the Virgin Islands: How We're Fighting an Invasive Species

Updated: Feb 20, 2023


The beauty of the Virgin Islands is no secret, but there are some unwanted visitors that have made their way to our crystal clear waters. One such visitor is the lionfish, an invasive species that can pose a serious threat to our native marine life. While it is unusual to spot lionfish while on a Happy Island Charter, it's important to understand the impact they can have and what we can do to help.


Lionfish are known for their striking appearance with their vibrant stripes and flowing fins, but their presence in the Virgin Islands waters can be detrimental to the local ecosystem. They are voracious predators that feed on small fish and invertebrates, and can quickly overtake native fish populations. This can lead to a chain reaction, with potentially devastating consequences for the entire ecosystem.



The lionfish invasion is a serious issue, and at Happy Island Charters, we're doing our part to combat it. While we don't often come across these invaders during our charters, we remain vigilant and report any sightings to the Caribbean Lionfish Response Program, a collaborative effort among government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and concerned citizens to control the lionfish population.


We encourage our guests to learn more about the lionfish and what we can do to help. In addition to reporting sightings, there are several other ways to contribute to the effort. For instance, local restaurants have started adding lionfish to their menus as a sustainable seafood alternative. By choosing to dine on this invasive species, we can help reduce their population in a sustainable and delicious way.


Together, we can work to protect the Virgin Islands ecosystem and ensure that our crystal clear waters remain home to a thriving marine life. To learn more about the Caribbean Lionfish Response Program, visit their website at www.corevi.org. And the next time you're on a Happy Island Charter, keep an eye out for these beautiful, but problematic, visitors.

10 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page